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IEEE802.3bt PoE++: The Future Of Power?

 

Ethernet is the standard for wired LANs (local area networks) and has been since the early 1980s. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) is the body that sets the standards for Ethernet, and they have been constantly evolving to stay up-to-date with the latest technologies. The most recent standard is IEEE802.3bt, which was released in September 2018. This standard supports PoE++, or “Power over Ethernet”, which allows for higher power levels to be delivered over Ethernet cables. So, what does this mean for the future of Power? Let’s take a look.

What is IEEE802.3bt PoE++?

IEEE802.3bt PoE++ is the next generation of Power over Ethernet technology that has the potential to revolutionize the way we power our devices. PoE++ enables up to 100 watts of power to be delivered over an Ethernet cable, which is enough to power even the most power-hungry devices. With this increased power delivery comes increased flexibility in how we can use PoE to power our devices. For example, PoE++ can be used to power both networking equipment and security cameras, making it a versatile solution for many different applications.

The Different Types of PoE++

In short, there are two types of PoE++. The first is active PoE++, which uses an external power supply to inject power into the Ethernet cable. The second is passive PoE++, which draws power from the Ethernet cable itself.

Active PoE++

Active PoE++ is the more common of the two types of PoE++. It uses an external power source, typically a 48V DC power supply, to inject power into the Ethernet cable. This type of PoE++ is often used in commercial and industrial applications where a higher voltage is required to power devices such as IP cameras or VoIP phones. Active PoE++ can also be used in home networking applications, but it is not as common due to the lower voltages used in most homes (typically 24V).

Passive PoE++

Passive PoE++ draws its power from the Ethernet cable itself. This type of PoE++ is less common than active PoE++ but has some advantages over it. First, passive PoE++ does not require an external power source, which can save money on installation costs. Second, passive PoE++ can deliver more power than active PoE++ (up to 60W per port), making it ideal for powering high-powered devices such as Access Points or IP cameras with Pan/Tilt/Zoom functionality.

Pros and Cons of PoE++

  1. Pros and Cons of PoE++:

As with any new technology, there are pros and cons to PoE++. Let’s take a look at some of the key points for both:

Pros:

– Higher power output than traditional PoE (up to 60W per port)

– More efficient power delivery

– Can be used with existing Ethernet cabling infrastructure

Cons:

– Costs more than traditional PoE equipment

– Requires specialized PoE++ switches and injectors

What is the future of PoE++?

As the world increasingly moves towards a more connected future, the need for reliable and efficient power sources becomes more important than ever. PoE++ is a new standard for power over Ethernet that promises to provide up to 100 watts of power per port, making it ideal for powering devices such as laptops, phones, and other small electronics. While the initial cost of implementing PoE++ may be higher than traditional PoE, the long-term benefits make it a worthwhile investment for any business or individual looking to stay ahead of the curve.

Conclusion

IEEE802.3bt PoE++ is a new standard for Power over Ethernet that promises to deliver up to 100 watts of power per port. This makes it ideal for powering devices like laptops, tablets, and even some small TVs. While the initial investment might be higher than traditional PoE, the long-term savings and increased efficiency make IEEE802.3bt PoE++ the future of Power over Ethernet.

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